Archive for November 2018

Port Adelaide hangs on to get the better of North Melbourne Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.
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Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

Photos from the round three game between North Melbourne and Port Adelaide. Picture: Getty Images.

TweetFacebookNORTH MELBOURNE2.0 5.4 11.7 16.9(105)

This was a game that Port Adelaide simply had to win and, as circumstances unfolded, it didn’t seem possible that North Melbourne could win. Port were facing a season crisis – they would be winless from three rounds if they went down – but North found themselves in a dire mid-game crisis.

The Roos had lost Nick Dal Santo for half a season, then Daniel Wells before the game.

By quarter-time, another key midfielder, Jack Ziebell, was coughing blood and subbed out with a bruised lung. At half-time, the Roos faced these obstacles, plus an imposing deficit of 20 points against a team renowned for its endurance. Later, in the last term, the Power held a 15-point lead.

Everything was in Port’s favour – incentive, injuries and the prospect that the Kangas wouldn’t have the legs to finish well. Ultimately, these factors conspired to produce the anticipated result – Port winning the game they couldn’t bear to lose.

But North did not accept the inevitably of defeat, that they were without key personnel, or that they trailed. The Roos were magnificent in maintaining their rage. They produced a spine-tingling counter-offensive in the third quarter, which had the 22,586 at Etihad roaring.

North’s third-quarter surge consisted of four consecutive goals – including a trademark bomb from 50 metres by shaggy cult figure Ben Brown, and another from defender Robbie Tarrant, who, in a symbolic moment, got off his knees and stood up to put his team in front. North clung on tenaciously but you sensed that, as the more intact team with fewer casualties (aside from Ollie Wines’ wrist/arm injury in the last quarter), Port would finish in front. The outcome wasn’t settled until, with under a minute left, Kane Mitchell converted from a composed piece of play by Jay Schulz, Travis Boak and Angus Monfries to give Port an eight-point lead.

North had taken Port to the limit. Just short of half-way through the final quarter, following a turnover that created a goal for Matthew Broadbent, Port’s margin had reached 15 points.

What unfolded next was as astonishing as it was enthralling. The Kangas, who had been cleaned up in the middle, took control – Andrew Swallow leading the reversal of Port’s centre clearance dominance. They banged on the next three goals, two of them to Lindsay Thomas, to snatch an improbable lead.

Port would regain it with just over four minutes left, via an Aaron Young goal that derived from a botched kick-in – one of a series of defensive blunders that Brad Scott deemed “diabolical.” The Power would not be headed thereafter.

Earlier, Port had opened up like a team that was playing the AFL version of T20, such was the intensity. The Power, displaying the zeal that had been absent in the loss to Sydney, had 10 of the first dozen forward entries. Broadbent was conspicuous in the initial blitz, roaming wide from his station at half-back, while midfielders Brad Ebert, Hamish Hartlett and Boak were productive. Ebert would finish with three goals and played a pivotal role. North’s major issue wasn’t the scoreboard, since Port had failed to convert their advantage in play and led by just nine points at quarter-time. More worrisome were the casualties, Ziebell having taken a hefty crunch that sent him to hospital. Sam Wright, too, had been cleaned up by Alipate Carlisle in a bump that personified Port’s early intent.

Carlisle, recognising that Wright was in pole position to create a score, had charged into the centre square – leaving his man (Petrie) and made a vigorous contest in which Wright was felled. He was off the field for some minutes before returning. Port’s Tom Jonas, meanwhile, had also taken a knock to the noggin and was nursing his jaw, in an opening that was far from bruise free.

Yet North withstood the Port barrage and the loss of Ziebell and began to win territory and possession. Sam Gibson was the major ball magnet in the first half, while the eternally speedy Brent Harvey, initially deployed at half-back, sparked up. Ben Brown, surprisingly not selected in North’s opening round shocker against the Crows, booted two important goals in the first half. Brown provided a more viable target than Jarrad Waite. North recovered well enough to briefly snatch the lead early in the second quarter when Brown slotted one.

Port also held an significant edge in centre clearances (18-8 at one stage). One particularly clean break in the second term led directly to a Schulz goal – one of three Schulz majors from interference/holding frees agaisnt Scott Thompson. Snaps to White and Ebert enabled it to re-establish a decent buffer – 20 points at the main break.

The result, at this point, seemed certain. In their refusal to accept the script, the Roos probably impressed more in defeat than Port in victory. But at season’s end, only the outcome will matter.

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Police and the ambulance attend to the victim of a one-punch assault in St Marys on Saturday evening. Photo: Supplied Paige Patello was nearby when the assault occured and said her friend was punched shortly after asking to borrow a lighter. Photo: Supplied
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A young man has been charged after allegedly punching a woman across the face and causing her to lose consciousness in Sydney’s west on Saturday night.

He allegedly became involved in an argument with a young woman he had not met previously after she asked to use his cigarette lighter outside the Major Oak theatre restaurant in St Marys on Saturday night.

Police say he struck the 29-year-old in a backhanded swipe across the face, causing her to reel backwards. She hit her head before slamming on to the concrete footpath. Fairfax Media understands she had previously been ridiculed in the restaurant for her homosexuality.

Witness to the assault Paige Patullo said her friend was struck almost immediately after asking to borrow the man’s lighter.

“I couldn’t see what was happening after that but he just whacked her. She hit her heard against the pole and fallen and smacked her head on the ground. Then blood just came everywhere,” said Ms Patello.

“It was with a closed fist. You could hear the impact and she didn’t get up for five minutes.”

The assaulted woman regained consciousness as the ambulance arrived and was able to climb onto the stretcher. She was taken to Nepean Hospital for non-life threatening head injuries and a cut above her eyebrow.

Inspector Grant Bissett told Fairfax Media they were surprised by the escalation of the argument.

“Neither were known to each other, or to police. It appears to have been a random, alcohol-fuelled fight,” Inspector Bissett said.

The 26-year-old man was arrested at the scene and charged at St Marys police station with assault causing actual bodily harm.

He was released on conditional police bail and will face Penrith Local Court on May 11.

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Movie plots can provide insights into our own career dilemmas. Photo: Kerrie Leishman
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Movie plots can provide insights into our own career dilemmas. Photo: Kerrie Leishman

Movie plots can provide insights into our own career dilemmas. Photo: Kerrie Leishman

Movie plots can provide insights into our own career dilemmas. Think about your favourite movie: what does it tell you about your career and your concerns?

A favourite movie plot is rags to riches. Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times is a classic as fresh today as when it was released in 1936. We see Chaplin’s little tramp overwhelmed by the technology of the factory workplace, but eventually finding happiness and love. It resonates for anyone who has felt swamped and crushed by work, with a message of hope that, with persistence, we can find work that allows us to express our talents.

Overcoming the monster is another common plot. James Bond movies appeal to many because they show the struggle of good over evil and, in Bond’s case, doing so with poise and elan. Monsters can appear in our careers in different forms. The monster might be a colleague, manager, client or funding body that must be confronted and defeated. It could be a psychological hang-up or obsession. Who doesn’t want to overcome their fears, or banish a monster colleague?

Maybe your favourite movie involves a quest. The Wizard of Oz is a classic of this genre. Do you see your career as being an exciting journey in pursuit of the wizard? Working towards some desired outcome that will result in great rewards either for yourself or others.

Voyage and return movies are all about learning and acquiring wisdom. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a classic example of this genre. Many of us have war stories about when we have ventured into new territories, faced challenges, discovered new worlds and returned a changed person. Working for particular employers, on a project or product can all provide voyage and return stories.

Sometimes our careers play out like a comedy, although we might not want to acknowledge this. Comedy nearly always involves a central character acting under a misapprehension that is clear to observers. In classical comedy, in the final act, everything becomes clear and the misunderstandings are resolved. Often, we relate to comedy because we have had the painful experience of blundering at work. Most careers have comic elements.

Sadly, some folks experience tragedy in their careers. Usually tragedy involves decisions taken that seem to be beneficial initially, but that unravel and have terrible consequences. Anyone who has remortgaged their home to finance a business that subsequently fails will understand the role of tragedy in careers.  Macbeth is a classic example of tragedy.

Finally, and appropriately after Easter, there is rebirth. Rebirth movies usually feature a character who falls under a dark power and effectively dies. Then, they are saved by an external agent and they are born again. Sleeping Beauty is the classic example of this tale. Many people can relate to dark periods at work where they felt numb, hollow or dead. The lucky ones can tell stories about being rescued by a mentor or other form of prince, who awakened them from their slumber and freed them from the dark power.

So, when you think of your favourite movie, have a think about what your choice might be telling you about your career.

Jim Bright is professor of career education and development at ACU and a partner at Bright and Associates. Email [email protected]苏州美甲美睫培训学校. Follow @DrJimBright. 

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Out and About in Bendigo: Photos Lachlan Trethowan, Matt Lambert and Matt Perry at the White Horse hotel
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Sibel Er, Laura Miller, Laura Hoffner and Rachel Hughes at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Zarabelle, Rachel and Archie Mason, Janelle Taylor, John Cartwright, Linda Mason and Jasmine Poyner at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Beck and Felicity Horsburgh at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Jaidi Jaskson-Leahy, Sue Anderson, Kerri Sartori, Anita Harrington, Macey Curnow, Molly and Sally Byrne, Tammy Blakely, Kanji and Forest Jackson-Leahy at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

A real weding breakfast for Kate and Shane Stradbrook at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Trish and John Randles at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Marian and Bernie Burke looking after grandson Lenny Bright at Percy & Percy.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Stephanie Harper, Greg Murphy, Bev and Brenda Murphym, Mick and Dee Palmer at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Bryan and Marcia Clements, Alison and Garry Robbins at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Vicki, Ollie and Mark Sushames at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Karen Ford and Louise Howland at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Elaine Brereton, Keith and Bev Richards and Roy Trimble at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Ian Stapleton, Yvonne Howells, Jennifer Stapleton, Ethel and David Forrester at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Ella Wales and Heylee Wagner at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Wendy and Rob Symonds at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

David and Cheryl Garner at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Jenny and Guy Martin at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Alistair, Ingrid and Jasper Duncan with Richard Phillips at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Jenny and Warren Backhouse, John Chiodo and Nicole Barwick at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Geoff and Lyn Baxter from Portland at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Chriss Brown, Sally McKinley and Russell Kelly at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Ebony Kronk, Sarah, Braxton and Luke Ryan at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Jess Hamer, Roger and Metty Davis and Lynne Pharoah-Hamer at The Boardwalk Bendigo.Picture: PETER WEAVING

Annalise and Adam Mundy, Phil Clayton at the White Horse hotel.

Tim McCarthy and Bec Sundblom at the White Horse hotel

Graeme Jenkins and Brendon Harris at the White Horse hotel

Philip Gattuso and Jim Aldersey at the White Horse hotel

Braden Wilkinson, Jason Ferrari, Alex Slobodian and Shaun Ermel at the White Horse hotel

Trevor Birks of Bendigo Beer and James Smith of Crafty Pint at The DispensaryPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Ewen Jones, Jess Woolley, James Baenisch at The DispensaryPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Amy Gill, Kirstie Lyons, Mathew Gill at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Corinne Delany and Emily Cowling at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Hannah Shanks and Nadene Dietz at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Lisa Wright, Xavier dietz, Chester Shanks at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Xavier Dietz, Chester Shanks, Lisa Wright, Nadene Dietz, Hannah Shanks at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Angela McNeill, Matt Allen, Belinda O’Brien, Elke Kramer at GPOPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Jamil Shamsi, Kashif Rana, Hadi Kashif, Sharoon Shoaib at The Coffee ClubPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Usman Mohyuddin, Inaya Usman, Usman Mansoor, Zayna Usman, Mohummed Ashraf at The Coffee ClubPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

Mr Ashraf, Dr Ghafoor, Dr Muhammad, Dr Mirza, Dr Rahman, Dr Jamil at The Coffee ClubPicture: BRENDAN McCARTHY

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Prince Harry plays wheelchair AFL with wounded soldiers in Darwin. Photo: Department of DefencePrince Harry is famous for his love of partying, but he has spent the past fortnight in much more austere conditions.
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The British Prince – known as Captain Harry Wales during his visit to Australia – has been based with the Australian Army in the Northern Territory and Western Australia since early April.

A statement released by the Defence Department on Sunday reveals that Captain Wales has taken flight simulation training before “heading out” in an attack helicopter reconnaissance flight from Darwin.

He has also learned how to find food and water in the bush, camped in the remote Kununurra​ region, done physical training with troops and played wheelchair AFL with wounded soldiers.

Captain Wales, due to retire from the British Armed Forces in June, is to travel to Gallipoli for Anzac Day and will then spend time with Australia’s special forces in Perth and the army in Sydney on his month-long military secondment.

Captain Wales’ only public engagement during his trip was a visit to the Australian War Memorial in Canberra when he first arrived.

A Kensington Palace spokesman has said that because it is not an official royal visit, Captain Wales does not plan to make any public speeches.

He will obviously let his helicopter flying do the talking instead.

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